audreyii-fic:

theamayasakarutaexperience:

bemusedlybespectacled:

amuseoffyre:

nothingeverlost:

Fourteen years ago, a Death Eater named Bellatrix Lestrange used the Cruciatus Curse on my parents. She tortured them for information, but they never gave in. I’m quite proud to be their son.

This hurts. A lot.

One of the scenes that I will never be able to forget from the book is the scene when they’re at the hospital and Neville’s mother comes and gives him the sweet wrapper. She’s been tortured to insanity, but some part of her, some tiny diamond hard fragment of who she was, smothered by the shattered remains of herself remembers her son enough to want to make him smile.

She gives him a present to make him smile, and you just know Neville took that sweet wrapper home with him and put it in a box with all the other random pieces of rubbish she has given to him over the past 14 years.

This is why Neville’s story makes me hurt much more than Harry. Neville’s parents are still there. He can still see them and touch them, but he can never and will never know what they think of him, of what he has become. But no matter what happens, he will do every damn thing he can to be a man they would be proud of. Even if he’s scared, he will be brave because they were.

Re: Neville will never know what they think of him: it’s interesting that Harry, for all he never knew his parents, interacts with them quite a lot for an orphan. Both the Priori Incantatem spell and the Resurrection Stone let Lily and James talk to Harry. They tell him how brave he is and how proud they are and how much they love him.

Neville gets a bubblegum wrapper.

what the hell made any of you think this was okay

(via phil-the-stone)

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

(via teddybddy)

rainbowrites:

kaitlin-kelly:

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

#before the films came out this is what i thought it looked like #like his scar doesnt even look like a scar in the films or offish illustrations it looks like a scratch #i think its cool to imagine his scar being very conspicuous and deep idk (via parmachkai​)

I love this, the way it looks like his head was split open and then healed back jagged and wrong. Reminds me of how there’s a little bit of Voldemort’s soul hiding within that scar.
Also yeah, the movie scar just looks like a weird little ‘N’ scratched over his eyebrow. IT BUGGED ME SO MUCH

rainbowrites:

kaitlin-kelly:

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

parmachkai

I love this, the way it looks like his head was split open and then healed back jagged and wrong. Reminds me of how there’s a little bit of Voldemort’s soul hiding within that scar.

Also yeah, the movie scar just looks like a weird little ‘N’ scratched over his eyebrow. IT BUGGED ME SO MUCH

(via theyoungwonderwoman)

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

(via theyoungwonderwoman)

aydol:

prodigalpen:

RIP Mike Brown. His momma said she didn’t want anymore pics of him laying dead on the street so she shared pics of him as she knew him. This is one…

And I swear if it’s the last thing I do on this bloody website we are gunna make sure this doesn’t get forgotten. If we can’t get justice we’ll get change. The event in ferguson show that things have to fucking change

aydol:

prodigalpen:

RIP Mike Brown. His momma said she didn’t want anymore pics of him laying dead on the street so she shared pics of him as she knew him. This is one…

And I swear if it’s the last thing I do on this bloody website we are gunna make sure this doesn’t get forgotten. If we can’t get justice we’ll get change. The event in ferguson show that things have to fucking change

(via potter-girl-in-the-tardis)

bocchan:

karhide:

windandsalt:

friarpark

#this is not an exaggeration okay #children do say this #children do wonder why they can’t find themselves in the media #don’t fucking tell me it doesn’t matter #it matters so much #children NEED to see themselves represented #or else they grow up feeling inferior and not worthy

okay, story time: i’m a resident actor a children’s theatre company, and we just did peter pan. i was cast as peter because i’m the only one who looks young enough to play the part; but aside from looking young, i look nothing like peter pan. he’s this little white boy with reddish brown hair and i’m an arab/hispanic queer with black hair and freckles. 

our company has a really devoted following, and these kids are reeeally young. after every show, we do autographs as the characters and have to keep up the act, because to a lot of these really young kids, we are who we pretend to be on stage. that terrified me. i’ve done autograph sessions in-character before, but never as such a well-loved character. who, again, is white. i was worried about what children might say.

over the course of the production, we must have performed for close to 500 kids, between the shows we did for families and the shows we did for school field trips.

and i distinctly remember one little white girl who came up to me with a DVD copy of disney’s peter pan, and she had this adorable tinkerbell dress on, and she just stared at me wide-eyed and after a while she said “i have all your movies!!”

first of all, if you don’t think that’s the cutest thing ever, please leave.

and when i asked her what she wanted me to sign, she handed me her DVD and said “by your face.” and she points right at this little white redheaded peter pan with pointy ears who is clearly not me, as if she can’t tell the difference… or she can, and she doesn’t care. similar things happened with different children, but it never lost its charm for me. on the contrary, it really warmed my heart.

by that same token there were many children of color who were affected by seeing a brown peter pan. a lot of them (usually older children) and/or their parents ask me how i got into acting, and if i had any advice for how to get into it. it meant a lot to me that there’s this whole generation of children of color who are going to pursue the arts, because even though i live in a very diverse area, our theatre landscape is still very whitewashed.

anyway, what i’m trying to say isn’t just that representation matters, which it does. what i’m also trying to say is that one less white face in the crowd isn’t going to hurt anyone. i feel like i’ve heard time and again that white people can only identify with white characters, and the whole point of my story is that that’s obviously not true. that kind of behavior, where people only empathize with characters who look like them, has to be taught. and that kind of behavior is racism.

bolding is mine, because that last bit really knocked it out of the park for me

(via theyoungwonderwoman)